Recommended: the ANIMANIMA Festival

Visit if you can !!

6 September 2012 – 9 September 2012

Contact: Milen Alempijević

E-mail: executive@animanima.org

Phone: 00 381 32 341 068

Fax: 00 381 32 225 073

Address: Dom kulture Čačak
Trg ustanka 2
Čačak
32000
Serbia

 

A principal aim of the ANIMANIMA festival is to affirm the art of animation, through featuring works of national and international authors. The works themselves comprise the most diverse techniques, ranging form the classical ones to the contemporary computerised techniques; they also cover a variety of forms, including artistic, commercial educative, experimental and other. Last but not least, the festival aims to bring together authors form all over the world, in a friendly and creative atmosphere.

Additional notes

There are two categories in the festival competition: films with the running times up to 30 minutes, and animated commercial or music video. Outside the competing segment, there is the special sections (reviews, lectures, retrospectives, miscellaneous shows, etc.), as well as the fringe events (exhibitions, concerts, promotions and similar events). There is a three-member Serbian Selection Comitee that selects the films for the festival, and there is a three-member international Jury that is in charge of the festival awards.

Tips for Directing Non-Professionals

Lights. Camera. Action. You hope. Directing professional talent isn’t always easy, but they usually know their jobs. Directing non-actors requires a different set of skills.

Directing non-professionals can be both rewarding and a real challenge. Whether it is the producer’s daughter or the CEO of a Fortune 500 company who insists on delivering the opening statement, directing non-professional talent takes a steady and patient hand. It also helps to have in your arsenal a few helpful hints and techniques ready to pull out at any given moment. In this column, we will discuss some ways to avoid potential pitfalls when directing non-professionals and ways to make your budding talent comfortable and capable of delivering a stellar performance.

Professional or Non-Professional – That Is the Question

Before trusting your production to the acting or speaking abilities of a non-professional, you need to ask yourself a few questions:

  • Are you under a strict deadline?
  • Will a national or even regional audience see your project?
  • Is it essential that the script be delivered completely as written, or will you be able to rewrite it to make it more easily presented by a non-professional?

If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, you should probably seek out a professional who would be willing to work for you within your budget. Why? A professional will be able to work through your project quickly and efficiently, using years of training and practice to deliver the script with the right emphasis, tone and pace. Professionals will not only save you time, but also will be able to present the script as written and adapt their voices or act their parts with an eye on the final outcome.

The practiced ability and polish of a professional usually will play more effectively for a regional or national audience. There will be no glaring accent or local feel to the talent, and this will enhance the credibility of the project. This doesn’t mean that non-professional talent will not be able to deliver a valuable performance – it will just take longer, and you will need to be aware of your audience.

Directing the Non-Professional in a Narrative Piece

The key to using non-professionals in a narrative piece is to typecast your roles. Typecasting means you cast people in roles they closely resemble in look and personality. Famous Russian director Sergei Eisenstein used to cast butchers as butchers and military men as soldiers to add authenticity to the performance. While the role you are casting may be no more than a support player in an ensemble cast, choosing someone who resembles the role will make it a lot easier on both of you. If, however, the producer insists on casting his daughter in the lead role of a production, hope that person is similar to the character she will be playing because, otherwise, you will need to work much harder to make sure she delivers the performance you need.

When you are working with non-professionals on the narrative set, rehearsal is essential. Make sure your actors are very familiar with their blocking (the movement of the actor from one point to another), motivation for their lines and any “business” you may want them to perform while acting their parts. Business is a film term for the actions the actor may be doing to make the character authentic. If you are shooting a scene with a mother, you may have her making sandwiches for her children before they run off to school. The making of the sandwiches is the actor’s business. A chef may be preparing food, a doctor performing surgery or a police officer cleaning a gun. It is essential that the business be well-rehearsed, so it looks very natural.

Acting is more than delivering lines. It is inhabiting the character in such a way that it becomes real. Nothing is more distracting than watching a character perform an action he doesn’t understand or has not practiced and perfected. Non-professionals, if typecast, can perform quite well if they relate to their characters and are familiar with the type of business their character is assigned.

While knowing the characters and their business is important to the non-professional, understanding the technical requirements of the craft also plays a role in the success of the performance. Walk the talent through their scenes, and explain what is going on around them and how they need to relate to the various technical aspects of the set. Get them used to the lights, the ever-present crew, the closeness of the camera and any other equipment or personnel that may invade their space at any given time. Have them practice walking up to their marks and delivering their lines, while doing their business. Explain to them how close the camera position may be, as well as the amount of space in the screen within which they have to work. Always make sure you present these details in layman’s terms, so your non-professional talent can easily understand them. Throwing jargon at novice actors will do nothing to build their confidence.

As you rehearse the scene, listen carefully to what the actors say and the way they deliver their lines. Give them encouragement if they blow a line or two. If they stumble on a particular line, work with the scriptwriter, if available, to find a way to say the same idea in a way the talent can handle. Sometimes certain words don’t seem to fit in an actor’s mouth, and a slight tweak of the dialogue without changing its meaning helps.

Before rolling tape, explain to the actors the typical procedure for doing the scene: the commands they will hear and the importance of each. The more familiar and comfortable the talent is on the set, the better the performance will be.

When rolling, watch the talent’s performance, and make sure you get what you are looking for. Do not be afraid to shoot multiple takes. Explain to the actor what you want during each take, and gently shape the performance so that both of you will be happy with the end result.

Directing the Non-Professional in a Non-Fiction Piece

More often than not, the non-fiction world is where you will be working with the non-professional talent. Often when you produce corporate video, the client prefers to use in-house people. This is actually to your advantage, since you will not have to explain to actors something they have no clue about. It is a bit like typecasting in the fiction narrative. The talent knows how to work the machinery, speak the jargon of the workplace or maneuver through a difficult procedure.

When working with the CEO or other administrative personnel, treat them with respect, but do not give in to their demands. They will often ask for cue cards or ready-made speeches. Both will lead to very stilted and drab performances they will not like in the end. You may allow them to use note cards, but, if they do, type the cue words on blue note cards in large letters, and have them hold the cards so that they are visible. Walk them through the material until they get comfortable working in front of the camera. When you do roll tape, their delivery will be a lot more relaxed, they won’t appear to be reading and they will present the information in a much more credible fashion than by reading a written speech.

On the technical side, when working with non-professionals, make sure you explain the equipment you are setting up and the objective of that particular shoot. Turn off the tally light so there isn’t a glaring red light in the talent’s eyes, reminding them they are on camera. This also will prevent their knowing when the camera is rolling.

As in the fiction narrative, rehearse both camera and talent moves. If you are looking for a certain emphasis during a moment in the script, place a mark on the floor and rehearse the movement with the talent. Make the movement as simple as possible to avoid confusion and make the final result professional in quality and tone.

The Director’s Role

When directing non-professional talent, you have to maintain an air of professionalism and confidence in the talent’s ability to perform to the standard needed to produce a great project. Walk them through everything, be patient, be supportive and always make sure your goal is very specific. A wishy-washy director would spell doom to a non-professional who might already be uncomfortable in front of the camera and crew. Explain everything as you go, and be prepared to answer questions that may arise. If needed, tweak the script so it fits better in the talent’s mouth. Above all else, do not yell, scream or carry on if they blow a line. Treat them with respect and kindness, and they will respond.

Final Cut

Working with non-professional talent, while at times seeming to be an all-consuming project, can be full of pleasant surprises. If you go to the set with a plan, work patiently with your talent and break the script into small, bite-size pieces, your shoot should be a big success.

Contributing editor Robert G. Nulph, Ph.D., teaches video and film production at the university level and owns an independent video production company.

THE PRODUCERS GUILD WEEKEND SHORTS CONTEST

Open to Entrants Worldwide
September 28 to 30, 2012

UPCOMING DEADLINE
September 12, 2012 – Regular Registration Deadline

MISSION AND OBJECTIVE
The mission of the Producers Guild Weekend Shorts Contest is to support talented producers through the Producers Guild’s Debra Hill Fellowship and to bring the inspirational spirit of Debra Hill’s life and work to new generations of storytellers. Entries for this competition will reflect themes and elements found in Debra Hill’s films, and revenues raised by the contest will fund the PGA’s Fellowship.

MORE ABOUT THE CONTEST
Filmmakers must pre-register to participate in the Contest, and all films must be submitted by the completion deadline on September 30 to be considered in competition. Exact challenge details and story requirements will be distributed to all registered entrants at the beginning of the 48-hour filming period and will reflect themes and elements found in Debra Hill’s films. Completed films should be no longer than five minutes in runtime, and will be evaluated based on creative merit, technical execution, and fulfillment of the assignment. Winners will be announced on November 9, 2012.

Register for the Producers Guild Weekend Shorts Contest today, and get ready to flex your creative muscles in a fast-paced and fascinating storytelling challenge while benefiting the Producers Guild’s Debra Hill Fellowship!

The 2nd Annual Producers Guild Weekend Shorts Contest, is benefiting the Producers Guild of America’s (PGA) Debra Hill Fellowship. A pioneer among women in film production, Debra Hill charted a course from production assistant to writer-producer of some of the most successful films in history. By the time of her death in 2005, her filmography included crowd-pleasing hits like Halloween and Escape from LA, as well as the critically-lauded Academy Award-nominee The Fisher King . Uniquely dedicated to honoring Hill’s memory and achievements, the Weekend Shorts Contest is proud to bring the adventurous spirit of her life and work to a new generation of filmmakers and audiences. The Contest is open to all filmmakers worldwide 18 years and older; registrants need not be a member of the Producers Guild to enter.

The Producers Guild invites producers of all experience levels to participate in this exciting contest. Tailored to test both storytelling ability and production efficiency, entrants must craft memorable and effective films based upon a pre-assigned topic, with a maximum of 51 hours at their disposal. All entrants will receive the same assignment, but each will no doubt approach the subject with his or her own individualized flair. Completed productions will be submitted online and evaluated by accomplished industry professionals – including producers Gale Ann Hurd and Stacey Sher – each of whom had strong personal friendships with Hill.

The Contest will award First-, Second-, and Third-Place prizes, each of which includes guidance and mentorship from a well-respected member of the PGA. Additional prizes designed to help emerging talents advance their filmmaking careers include a $60,000 USD gift certificate from Panavision, a one-year subscription to Movie Magic, and a $10,000 gift certificate for grip and electric rentals from Cinelease.

 


KEY WEST FILM FESTIVAL

Key West, Florida – USA
November 29 to December 2, 2012

 

The Key West Film Festival (KWFF) showcases independent films that exhibit excellence in storytelling and capture that alluring essence of Key West: creativity, diversity, sustainability, and breathtaking beauty. The festival promises a relaxed, welcoming setting in which filmmakers will find ample opportunities to network with industry talents while dreaming up their next projects.

KWFF is proud to launch its inaugural celebration of film at Tropic Cinema and at the historic San Carlos Institute, the home of Cuban independence. All festival venues are within easy walking distance of one another, and all are just a few steps away from legendary Duval Street, offering dozens of galleries, attractions, and watering holes.

The festival is accepting narrative and documentary feature film entries from Florida and around the world. KWFF’s program will also include stimulating panels and workshops with film professionals that complement the festival’s dynamic slate of films.

UPCOMING DEADLINE
August 31, 2012 – Late Deadline

MORE ABOUT THE FESTIVAL
Key West has a formidable history of inspiring some of America’s greatest creative thinkers, including Ernest Hemingway who wrote For Whom the Bell Tolls, Death in the Afternoon, and several other classics in the warmth of Key West, and Tennessee Williams, who lived in the region for several years.

For the chance to trace the footsteps of some of the greatest American storytellers while enjoying a welcoming festival experience, submit your film to the Key West Film Festival today!

ANGAELICA FISCAL SPONSORSHIP

December 15 to 31, 2012

 

The 7th Annual Angaelica Fiscal Sponsorship Program, is offering support to filmmakers with a passion for the arts and ecology. Through Angaelica, artists and collaborators are connected and elevated through the shared experience of creativity, social good, and development of sustainable communities. A non-profit organization, Angaelica is eager to help bold and innovative artists at any stage of their respective film projects.

Through an independent and collaborative community of artists, Angaelica seeks to help artists create memorable new films, connect to a broader community, and develop vital artistic and financial relationships that will help them sustain their careers well into the future. Through the Columbia Gorge International Film Festival, now in its sixth year, Angaelica draws upon a sizable network of knowledgeable contacts ready to be connected to great creative works. By aligning with Angaelica as your fiscal sponsor, your project will receive added benefits upon completion including complimentary submission to the Columbia Gorge International Festival, as well as to Angaelica’s independent exhibit unveiled during Art Basel Miami Beach.

Recipients of the Angaelica Fiscal Sponsorship will receive aid in legal areas, publicity, and fundraising, and will share a common platform with the Angaelica organization that promotes sustainable communities and ecological empowerment. Every project sponsored by Angaelica will also receive aid in the planning and execution of a red carpet premiere at an Angaelica event. Whether your project is in its infancy or is in the can, Angaelica is eager to learn more about it.

UPCOMING DEADLINE
September 1, 2012 – Late Deadline

MISSION AND OBJECTIVE
Angaelica is a non-profit organization dedicated to promotion of the arts and ecology. It connects artists and collaborators through the power of storytelling and the desire to build sustainable artistic communities.

MORE ABOUT THE FESTIVAL
In addition to offering financial aid to filmmakers and their films, Angaelica is proud to reward screenplays with similar support. Talented writers are invited to submit a treatment, project concept, or finished screenplay. Teleplays, stage plays, and live performance pieces are also accepted. At Angaelica, the true value of a work is not measured by its format, but rather by its spirit.

Angaelica is a collaborative of environmental artists and farmers that believes in creating sustainable communities through artistic excellence. Its members are enthusiastically involved in urban farming projects and alternative energy endeavors and are active participants in ensuring each is responsible for what is used, reused, and created during any artistic process. If you’re a filmmaker or screenwriter with an eye for cinema and a heart for our planet, submit your creative work to Angaelica today!

SAN DIEGO BLACK FILM FESTIVAL

San Diego, California – USA
January 31 to February 3, 2013

 

The 11th Annual San Diego Black Film Festival (SDBFF), is showcasing African American and African Diaspora films. Located in gorgeous San Diego, California, this celebration combines sun, sand, and cinema with countless networking opportunities, and is one of the largest black film festivals in the country. Screening over 100 films a year in a broad variety of categories, SDBFF has cultivated a strong industry reputation as a place where talent is regularly scouted and discovered.

Each year the SDBFF program includes an awards dinner, filmmaker’s breakfast, panel discussions, opening reception, and a red carpet for filmmakers. The dynamic film program includes narrative and documentary features and shorts, as well as comedies, animated films, and music videos.

Opportunities for success at SDBFF are as varied and as exciting as the festival’s lineup; SDBFF awards include Best Dramatic Feature, Best Dramatic Short, Best Documentary Short, Best Religious Film, Best Cutting Edge Film, Best GLBT Film, Best Animation, and a host of others. Winning an award at the San Diego Black Film Festival adds significant industry prestige to a filmmaker’s resume and has helped launch the careers of past winners.

UPCOMING DEADLINE
August 31, 2012 – Regular Deadline

MISSION AND OBJECTIVE
The San Diego Black Film Festival celebrates cinema and community by providing a vehicle for worldwide exposure of quality African American and African Diaspora films.

MORE ABOUT THE FESTIVAL
SDFF takes place in downtown San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter, the historic heart of the city with numerous shopping venues and electric nightlife. Submit your film to the San Diego Black Film Festival today for the chance to participate in one of the largest and most prestigious black film festivals in the country!

GOTHAM SCREEN Film Festival and Screenplay Contest

6 Annual October 04, 2012 to October 14, 2012

 

MISSION & OBJECTIVE
The mission of the GOTHAM SCREEN Film Festival & Screenplay Competition is to create an opportunity for filmmakers to have their work shown and critically judged in New York. The festival aims to create a positive industry and audience exposure for works that would otherwise not easily get seen, and for new writing, directing and acting talent to get discovered.

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL
The 6th Annual GOTHAM SCREEN Film Festival and Screenplay Contest will take place October 4-14, 2012 in New York City.

Following the success of the 2011 edition, this years event has been expanded to showcase more short and feature films during a week of screenings at the storied Quad Cinema in Manhattan, New York City, and other locations.

Gotham Screen is looking for fresh voices and perspectives from local, national and international filmmakers.

The 2012 Screenplay Contest comes again with a $2,500 cash prize for the winning screenplay! In addition, excerpts from selected contest entries will be performed live by professional actors at a staged reading during the festival.

Recognizing the need for quality projects in the industry, and realizing that this need can not always be satisfied by established writers with agency representation, the GOTHAM SCREEN Screenplay Competition has been set up with the goal to find the Next Great Screenplay, and to give previously undiscovered writers a chance at getting their craft recognized and their projects produced.

The GOTHAM SCREEN Screenplay Competition specializes in lower- to mid- range budgeted projects. We are actively looking for scripts that can be produced with budgets in the 2-15m dollar range. While we realize that great writing exists beyond this range, the GOTHAM SCREEN Screenplay competition is not the appropriate venue for it. Our targeted budget range will most likely exclude high budget action or special effects driven stories, most science fiction, many epics and/or historic movies, as well as most animation projects.

Producers and Financiers have as much interest in great stories and screenplays, as the struggling writer has to get her or his next project onto the screen. Realizing that this is a two way relationship that calls for a new kind of approach, GOTHAM SCREEN strives to find projects and writers that can have a real chance in the marketplace.

ORGANIZERS
Alex Blakeney ; Michael Gunther (Festival Registrar) ; Michael Gunther (Festival Registrar) ; Walter Gamper ; Walter Gamper

GENERAL RULES
– Entrants must fully comply with the Entry Rules & Regulations, including deadline(s), entry material requirements and selected film requirements. Submitting to GOTHAM SCREEN constitutes acceptance of these Rules, Regulations and Requirements.

– The GOTHAM SCREEN Film Festival and Screenplay Contest is open to everyone. You must be 18 years or older (21 in some states) to participate, or have written consent from your parent or guardian.

– Screenplay submissions must be in English, Film submissions must be in English, or subtitled in English.

– International submissions are encouraged, as long as they are in English (screenplays and English language films), or subtitled in English (non-English language films).

– Multiple entries are admissible, but each entry must be accompanied by its own separate submission. You may submit more than one screenplay per writer, or more than one film per director, and you may submit more than one film or screenplay per category

– Contest winners and selected films will be notified by early-October 2012 (approximately). You must give us a valid e-mail address to be notified.

OPEN CALL FOR ENTRIES • Select a Category of Entry to continue.

SCREENPLAY
While we are looking for great stories of any kind, we are encouraging submissions in the following genres: 

– DRAMA
– COMEDY
– HORROR
– THRILLER/SUSPENSE
– FAMILY
– ADVENTURE
– ROMANTIC COMEDY
– ROMANCE
– ACTION
– SCI-FI
– FANTASY
– SUPERNATURAL
– WESTERN
– URBAN
– DOCUMENTARY
– SCIENCE

Selected entries in this category can made available to the industry (upon request, and with the submitters agreement only), and a number of previous participants and winners have had their work optioned or were further commissioned by producers and production companies.

FEATURE FILM
Gotham Screen each year shows an eclectic mix of US and International Feature Films, from both new directors as well as established filmmakers. Our sophisticated New York audiences like to be surprised, scared, moved and entertained, and appreciate the craft of great storytelling. Among them the occasional scouts from major sales- and distribution companies have been known to attend the screenings as well, and subsequently contact selected filmmakers of interesting movies.
SHORT FILM
One of our favorite audience categories! A number of Short Films of different genres, lengths and formats, from both US and International filmmakers, are shown each year to a discerning and enthusiastic audience.
DOCUMENTARY
Feature-length documentary films, over 45 minutes in runtime. Documentary shorts should be submitted to the Short Film category. Another audience favorite – documentary screenings have drawn good responses from audiences looking for something new and different.
STUDENT / EXPERIMENTAL
Our newest category is specifically for student and experimental filmmakers who want to be critically judged against their peers. They are usually shown together with other short film entries, but are judged as a separate category. And if your film is really exceptional, it even has a chance to win the coveted “Best Short Film” award and cash prize!

 

ILLINOIS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Chicago, Illinois – USA
November 2012

 

UPCOMING DEADLINE
August 31, 2012 – Late Deadline

The 7th Annual Illinois International Film Festival (IIFF), is celebrating all aspects of the filmmaking process and the people who work tirelessly to bring great stories to the screen. The festival also attracts plenty of filmmakers and film lovers to share in the excitement of the diverse annual showcase, offering numerous opportunities for networking and discussion.

For years, IIFF has proudly celebrated not only filmmakers but also screenwriters – those skilled creative talents who literally create something from nothing. Winners in last year’s screenwriting category told the stories of a Mexican drug cartel, a Turkish wrestler battling against his cultural history, and a young man who finds unimaginable adventure while living in a nursing home. At IIFF, no story is too outlandish or “experimental” to be worthy of consideration, and the only limits to success are your own imagination.

Competitive categories at IIFF span a wide gamut and include documentary, animated, horror, science fiction, and student films. No matter what your budget or vision, IIFF has a category for you. Screenplay and film submissions to IIFF are evaluated by a committee composed of festival organizers and executives. Because this festival is truly dedicated to celebrating the individual voices of talented filmmakers, accepted films will determine the festival’s structure, and not the other way around. IIFF is tailored to the filmmakers it celebrates, and is devoted to connecting those filmmakers with audiences and industry experts who share in their excitement for cinema.

 

MISSION AND OBJECTIVE
The Illinois International Film Festival brings audiences and filmmakers together to better enjoy the art and fun of filmmaking. It offers filmmakers the opportunity to learn, grow, and exhibit their work, and it offers attendees films that will expand their knowledge of cinema and enhancing their appreciation of the filmmaking process.

MORE ABOUT THE FESTIVAL
The beating heart of this festival is the incomparable city of Chicago, one of America’s most beloved urban landscapes and a melting pot for cineastes, musicians, and artists of all types. Explore Millennium Park, enjoy the world-renowned Shedd Aquarium, and stop by the Second City Comedy Club when you’re not immersed in a variety of great films or bustling IIFF social events. With the festival as your entry point to the sights, sounds, and flavors of Chicago, you’ll always have something to do or discover.

Unbeatable travel deals are available for friends and visitors of IIFF to attend the festival, ensuring that your stay is not only enjoyable but affordable. Submit your film or screenplay to the Illinois International Film Festival today for the chance to explore all that Chicago and its robust film community has to offer!

 

TRAIL DANCE FILM FESTIVAL

Duncan, Oklahoma – USA
January 25 to 26, 2013

The 7th Annual TRAIL DANCE FILM FESTIVAL (TDFF). is held annually in Duncan, Oklahoma – the birthplace of legendary filmmaker Ron Howard – the festival introduces up-and-coming filmmakers from around the globe to Oklahoma’s emergent film industry, and provides a welcoming forum and film showcase amidst a beautiful Western landscape.

The festival has garnered respect on the circuit and earned accolades. TDFF was honored with the “Outstanding New Event” RedBud Award at the Governor’s Conference on Tourism and MovieMaker Magazine has named Trail Dance in their “Top 25” lists three times – once as “Worth the Entry Fee,” and twice as one of the “Coolest” film festivals.

TDFF offers visiting filmmakers lodging discounts and local transportation from the airport, hotel, and area businesses to the event venue. The festival partners with the Oklahoma Film and Music Commission to provide visiting filmmakers with information on locations, crew members, actors, and financial incentives in Oklahoma. All TDFF festivities are open to the public and include live entertainment, professional seminars, networking opportunities, Wild West gunfights, music, and much more. The Festival concludes with a grand awards gala where the Golden Drover Awards are presented to worthy filmmakers, and where one lucky student is awarded a scholarship to pursue a career in filmmaking.

UPCOMING DEADLINE
August 15, 2012 – Regular Deadline

MISSION AND OBJECTIVE
It is the goal and mission of the Trail Dance Film Festival to encourage originality and creativity, as well as to promote the growing film industry of Oklahoma.

MORE ABOUT THE FESTIVAL
TDFF has quickly emerged as a premier film event in the Southwestern United States. The festival is the flagship event of the Trail Dance Film Festival Association, a non-profit organization that creates scholarship funds for students studying film and media arts in addition to promoting cinema appreciation in Oklahoma. Trail Dance boasts three state-of-the-art venues and a 750-seat auditorium with top-notch sound and projection systems – all within short walking distance of TDFF headquarters.

The Trail Dance Film Festival annually delivers a one-of-a-kind program and great festival experience for filmmakers and fans alike. Submit today!

BAJA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Cabo – MEXICO
November 14 to 17, 2012
Upcoming Deadline: August 13, 2012

 

The BAJA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (BIFF) invites filmmakers from across the globe to the beautiful Pacific resort of Cabo for a four-day celebration of community, cinema, and international flavors. BIFF showcases a diverse and tightly curated film program including U.S., Mexican, and international cinema, and underscores the ability of art to transcend geography, cultures, and languages. Academy-Award nominated actor Edward Norton will serve as Official Festival Advisor in the inaugural season.

As host of the 2012 G20 summit, and as a popular vacation destination for stars including George Clooney, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Jennifer Aniston, Cabo is poised to welcome its festival guests with luxury and unsurpassed hospitality. The festival provides complimentary round-trip flights from L.A. to Cabo, or from Mexico City to Cabo, for all accepted filmmakers. BIFF encourages public participation through community events and educational filmmaking programs; leading filmmakers from the United States and Mexico will be on-hand to provide mentorship to film producers, directors, screenwriters, and actors of all backgrounds. Submit to the Baja International Film Festival today and celebrate cinema in the lap of luxury!